Sunday, 29 April 2007

The Thinking Blogger Award...





Oooh...


Guess what? Raden Galoh has tagged me with the ahem, 'Thinking Blogger Award'...

She said:-

Daphne Ling: She scores my heart with her selfless efforts. She sees the trauma and difficulties of others beyond skin colors. She’s young, she is petite but she has a very BIG heart… I always think that if this country has so many people like her, we will reach VISION 2020 easily. Her humanitarian spirit is flaming with courage.


Wow...That means a lot to me (especially the petite part...Hehe)...

So, dear people, kindly allow me to beria sedikit: Honestly, it did come as a surprise, seeing that I've only had a public blog for slightly more than a month! All this while, it has been common knowledge that half the white and grey cells in my brain do not function...Kind of like people in some government departments, where they sit around just for show, with interesting pangkats, but really, they serve no real purpose...


You know, my dad suggested a long time ago that I try and learn my school-work through osmosis. But I have always argued that since the osmotic process involved water particles moving from the area with most water to the place with less water, my theory is that by the end of the day, I would have an even emptier brain than usual, thanks to all the water moving out of my head!


So yes, this is indeed an honour, especially if had I been tagged by someone else, I would have wanted to tag Raden Galoh! *Ish...Too late!*...


So, now, I am supposed to go tag another 5 people whom I think make me think (Oh dear, mouthful, isn't it?)...


So, I present to you:-


1) Renett Grove: Renett suffers from Spinal Muscular Atrophy, and spends most of her time working from her bed. Renett has two lovely dogs, Micky and Jackie (Oh my, so cute!)...What I really admire about her and her blog is that it reminds all of us to learn to look at the simple beauty around us, and that the most important thing is that we're alive...Drop her a line or two for encouragement, yea?


2) Jennifer Tai: I really like Jennifer's blog. Jenn was a former journalist (Aha! Maybe that's why...) and she now blogs about her life as a live-at-home mom. What I really admire is that she had no qualms giving up her career, and her blog gives us an insight into the little world of children, and her joys as a mother. It has made me think over and over again: What kind of mother would I be?


3) Zorro @ Bernard Khoo (Unmasked): Zorro...Where do I start? Well, I really like how he always takes up the most simple of issues and turns it into a complete comedy strip, but with very subtle messages and information. His postings are always funny, but always oozing with sarcasm too!


4) Hizami: Hizami, like me, is only 21 years old. But we believe in the same ideals for a better world. Like truth, justice, faith, hope and love, cliche as they are. His blog is among the few 'young people' blogs who talk about issues, as opposed to the ones who rant only about what their boyfriend/girlfriend did...


5) Jimi: Jimi is a great lover of books (like me!) and of movies...His blog revolves around the movies which he loves, but what I find to be special is that he doesn't blog solely on the special effects, the costumes etc, but on the messages that each and every movie carries: Messages which we can learn from and adopt into our lives.


Ok...I'm done! I really could not believe how difficult it was finding 5 blogs...Sheesh...


Anyway, there is a downside to being Memetag-ed...You now have to go find some other 5 blogs which you think are worthy of being tagged...


*Hmmm...Is this some nice way to make us 'tagged Bloggers' actually sit down and think?*

Now, this award was started here (by some person called Ilker Yoldas):


Should you choose to participate, please make sure you pass this list of rules to the blogs you are tagging.

The participation rules are simple:

1. If, and only if, you get tagged, write a post with links to 5 blogs that make you think,

2. Link to this post so that people can easily find the exact origin of the

meme,

3. Optional: Proudly display the 'Thinking Blogger Award' with a link to the post that you wrote.


Please, remember to tag blogs with real merits, i.e. relative content, and above all - blogs that really get you thinking!



Saturday, 28 April 2007

I Own A Tin Mine...


Comical huh?

Sigh...

You know, when you hit 21 years old, it is supposed to be the time of your life...It is supposed to be the time when you do things you have never done before; try your hand at something which signifies this amazing transition from childhood to womenhood...

But my 21 year-old year is marked with one thing in mind: My Orthodontic Braces...

Yes, you heard right...My braces...



Not my teeth...

Unfortunately, I am vain, and vanity has made me do things I would never have imagined myself doing...I hate dentists, and had it not been that my neighbour is one, I would have fought tooth-and-nail when my six-monthly appointments were due...

And to think that I actually consented to have 5 of my precious teeth pulled, and all for the sake of ahem, beauty...

You know, for some reason, people just do not take you seriously with braces on.
There is this mistaken belief that braces are only for the young and really folly (Think of young Willie Wonka in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory). I have always had a very serious face, and people have always thought me to be older than my age, but my brace has changed all that...


Hehe

Was just thinking of all the things I can and cannot do with my brace on...And I made a short list...

I Can:-


1) Get away with not eating apples (Yay!!!)

2) Look younger than my age when I need to (and when I don't...Hrmph...)


3) Carry a pocket mirror and not be called vain...

4) Claim I own a tin mine...

5) Spend hours brushing, flossing and cleaning my teeth without my mum telling me I spend too
much time on my teeth...

6) Sound stupid and get away with it...


Will you take
Mona Lisa seriously if she looked like this?...

I Cannot:-

1) Eat apples (Woohoo!!!)...

2) Chew chewing gum...

3) Speak properly (Try saying The Very Wide Van Went Voom When Willy Was Vile and Vicious) ...

4) Wear a proper formal attire or office-wear attire and look the role...

5) Have a brain MRI without the scanned image looking a little distorted (I haven't tried!)...

6) Bite my nails (cannot reach lar), or bite-to-break a piece of string...




I hate these...

Deng...

You know, I was trying on this amazing A-Line skirt just yesterday, and I loved it, and my mum loved it, and the saleslady loved it...I was about to say "I'll take it", when I made the mistake of smiling...Immediately, both my mum and the saleslady said: "The skirt looks too old on you when you smile"...

Sheesh...All because of my brace...


But you know what? It's ok...I'm thinking of the amazing smile I will have in about a year or so...


Vanity pays...

Hehehe...



Sunday, 22 April 2007

A Celebration of Life...

Quote of the day:

PATIENCE

"O you who believe, seek courage in fortitude and prayer, for God is with those who are patient and persevere"

~Al-Qur'an, 2:153~


Photo stolen from Jacqui's Curve

Sigh...

Today's the 23rd of May...Today strikes a chord, because so many things have happened, and 2 will always remain fresh in my mind...

This day, 3 years ago, I got a call from one of my friends (ZZ), at around 1.30 in the morning...The minute I picked up the phone, I knew something was wrong...Call it intuition, call it my annoying, uncanny way of reading what people are not saying, but I knew something was wrong...

She sounded normal, and she chatted like normal...I was just waiting for the bombshell...It didn't come...

We hung up after about 4 minutes, yakking about nothing important whatsoever...Almost immediately however, the phone rang again, and this time ZZ didn't sound so good. Her voice was heaving, she spoke in a whisper, and her monotone sentence sounded deeply weighted: "Daph, I don't want to die"...

She had evidently burst into tears the minute she hung up, and she was evidently trying to say this the first time she called...

I was stunned..."What?" was the first thing that raced through my mind...

Through sobs, she told me the doctors said she had Type 1 Diabetes...I felt my own heart sink...

We talked for about half an hour after that, and I tried my best to calm her down, not knowing whether what I said made her feel any better...or worse...

I wonder...Why is it that people are subjected to such tests? Here she was, all at 18 years old, at the prime of her life...And here she was faced with the prospect of having to depend on medication and injections for the rest of her life...

I guess it's at times like this that you just feel so helpless and so overwhelmed. It's also times like these that you remember how fragile life actually is, and how we really have no control over what is going on, and that really, the only thing that distinguishes us from one another is how we cope with the situation...

***

I was again reminded of how fragile life is, today, a year ago...

Today, exactly one year ago, my dear Chee Keong stopped breathing properly for a few minutes...He was spiking a fever, and I had gone into the hospital at 6.45 am in the morning to be with him. I walked in and I saw him lying on the bed. He was in a fitful sleep, his tiny hands clutching the blankets for dear life, and his teeth were silently chattering...The nurses were busy preparing for hand-over, so no one could attend to him...

I picked him up, wrap him in some light blankets, and settled down in a chair by his bed, just holding him. He dozed off more peacefully in my arms and his grip relaxed. Perhaps it was because he felt a little more secure in someone's arms than just lying there on the vast bed, alone...

I sat there with him till about 9 a.m, when he suddenly gave one gasp and went rigid...At that time, I had been with him long enough to know that something was wrong...I immediately called for a nurse who agreed: He didn't look right...

We hooked him up to a machine to check his SpO2, and found that the concentration of oxygen in his body had gone down to 94%...They instantly put him on the nebulizer and did a few other things, but his breathing was still not right...

As we were doing all this, I suddenly realised that all the nurses had stopped work...They all came and hovered over Chee Keong...Two of them (I think it was Kak NoorAida and Kak Marina) gripped my shoulder...I was actually too shocked to cry...The concentration of SpO2 in his blood did come down a little more, but I was not up to it to even look anymore...

It was at that moment that I wondered what it must be like for parents to lose their child...Can you imagine? It ranks as one of the most cruel ironies life can throw smack into your face when a parent has to bury his/her child...

As I held Chee Keong in my arms that day, I did not ask for God to save him, to prolong his life...All I asked was for God's Will to be done, whatever It may be...

God decided to let us keep him...Because my dear CCK is still around today, just not in my arms anymore...And you know, ZZ is now doing well too...

There were other times when Chee Keong's life hung on tenterhooks, but I'll blog about them another day...

As for today, the 23rd of March 2007, I will pay tribute to it as a day in which the spirit to live triumphed over misery and death...

It is the day in which God said: I'll give you one more chance...

It is the day in which I will remember as a reminder to embrace life, to live it to the fullest, and to never take things for granted...

Today, just like every other day, should be a celebration of Life...

Thursday, 19 April 2007

Effect Change; Sustain It...


I got this in my email today; It travelled all the way from Lenore Lawrence in the Pacific Northwest to Gayle Hoover Thorne in California, to a friend of mine, Phil Christensen, from South Africa...

The original source of the information can be found here...

Anyway, I found the email to be very apt, given certain erm, events, and I wanted to share it here...


"10 simple ideas to
eliminate racism


1) Don't laugh at racist, sexist, ageist,
homophobic and other stereotypical jokes or assumptions. By laughing, you're
acknowledging the joke is appropriate and encouraging more inappropriate
comments. You can interrupt without being rude. Don't let your silence speak for
you. Simply say, "I don't find that funny," or "I don't appreciate jokes like
that."


2) Make an effort to get to know people
different than you. Look for things in common with other people and celebrate
the differences. We can
learn from and
appreciate something about everyone.


3) Learn about other people and their
culture. By learning about other people, your life will be greatly enriched and
your appreciation for your own culture will deepen.


4) Think before you speak. Words can hurt,
whether you mean them to or not. When describing a person, think if mentioning
their race is important to the story. Do you refer to everyone from South or
Central America as Mexican? If you don't know someone's country of origin, don't
assume. Some people prefer Black, while others like African American. Some
prefer Latino/a, others like Hispanic. If you're unsure which to use, ask. It's
important to use the correct language.


5) Be a role model. Be vocal in opposing
discriminatory views and practices, especially with friends and family who
respect your opinion. Don't criticize, but help educate others about issues and
about your own experiences.

6) Don't make assumptions. Do you assume
that African Americans like rap music or that Asians are good at math?
Stereotypes hurt everyone. Examine what your prejudices are and make adjustments
to look at everyone asan individual.


7) Explore the unfamiliar. Attend an
organization meeting, religious service or travel to a new region where you are
in the minority. Forexample, if you are Christian attend a Jewish service at a
synagogue. If you attend an all white suburban school visit an inner-city
multi-cultural school. This first-hand experience can be enlightening and give
you perspective.


8) Work on projects with members of groups
different from your own. Working as an equal alongside others from different
groups on a common project is one of the best ways to undo prejudice and
increase familiarity with others.


9) Be a proactive parent. Expose your
children to diversity at a young age. Read stories that explain the point of
view of other groups. Discuss TVshows, movies or books that present stereotypes.
Children can benefit from knowing other children from different groups at very
early ages, before prejudices and biases are formed.


10) Support anti-prejudice and anti-racist
organizations. Whether your efforts are in volunteering, financial donation or
being an advocate, working with other groups toward the same goal can be
beneficial to you and the community. You'll meet great people and find real
support for your efforts. By getting involved, your voice can make a big
difference at the local level."

I agree with the statements, although I do concede that it is not easy to eliminate racism, or any other form of bigotry for that matter...

I guess the most important thing is that people want these changes to be a part of their life...That people actually want racism, sexism, chauvinism and all the forms of bigotry to be a thing of the past...We cannot effect change if people do not want change; we cannot effect change if we all do not will it to happen...

Because ultimately, it is everyone playing a role which will bring about change in our society. While it is true that all it takes is one person to effect change by standing up for what he/she believes in, I believe that it takes the whole of society to sustain that change...

And that, is going to take some time to achieve...

Wednesday, 18 April 2007

I.M.A.G.I.N.E...


Sigh...

I found this very beautiful Iranian page, with a very beautiful video...It was so beautiful I watched it a few times; even played it over and over again so I could copy down the words.

If you have the time, go and watch the video. Although it takes quite a while to load, it is definitely worth your time...

The message in the video was this, and I'll like to share it with you:-

IMAGINE

Imagine it, even though, it is hard to do so,
A world in which every man is very lucky,
A world in which money, race and power are not considered as positions,
The reply to homophonies is not riot police,
Neither it has unclear bomb nor bomber, nor motar,
No child will leave his foot on the landmine anymore,
All are free and without pain,
You won't read, whales suicide in the newspaper.

Imagine a world without disgust and gunpowder,
Without opinionated cruelty, without panic and coffin,
Imagine it, even if it is a crime,
Even if your throat is filled with Collyrium by calling its name,
Imagine a world in which prison is a legend,
All of the wars of the world has led to an armistice,
Nobody is the master, people are of the same position,
Every seed of wheat is a share for every man,
With no border and no domination,
Fatherhood means the whole world,
Imagine that you can be the fulfillment of this dream.

~Zamani~

If you want to watch is, just visit this page...

I especially loved the last line that said: Imagine that you can be the fulfillment of this dream...

Really...imagine if we all could...

It is really the direction in which this world should be progressing in. But it is so sad that I won't be here to witness the apocalypse of the Old World Civilisation, and the birth of the new one.

But it really tugs at the heartstrings when you read such messages, because it is a sign that the idea of peace and freedom and justice is not an unthinkable thought. It might seem impossible to achieve at the moment, but I have faith in the human spirit. And I am confident that if a few simple souls are touched by the message, then they will strive to pass the message, even if it is just to their friends.

I am confident that one day, these words will be turned into action. There will come a time when mankind will be ready to accept this changes of abolition of power. And when that day comes, then we can truly say that we are an evolved and unsurpassable civilisation.

A civilisation that is truly moral in origin.

But when will that day come?

I don't know...

But I know it will come, even if I won't see it...

Saturday, 14 April 2007

Aisya: I, Reply...




Photo from The Star



When I first saw Melayu Jati’s message, it slapped me across the face,
I wondered if he was stupid to still be talking about race,
But then I saw he thought me stealing from Aisya, of all deeds done,
Disembowel him I would, if I had butcher-knife, stake and gun.

Really, hello, have you actually been following the story?
How to steal money when I’ve not touched or smelled any,
As for diapers, milk and nestum, I’m sure you all agree,
Why would I want that, unless Duh! I have a baby.

I could have come here to swear and spit and curse,
But why should I sink so low, for I’ll be none the worse,
MJ, in case you haven’t heard, we live in the Land-of-Boleh,
Frogs like you (into your tempurung!), are just not worth our day!


*Ribbit*




Dear all,



The donations today stand at RM 14, 450 and I am pleased to inform you all that we have pledges of a year’s supply of nestum, milk, diapers, and glucose. This is of course in addition to pledges from two sponsors to pay for Aisya’s suction machine…

I think it is time everyone hears my side of the story too:-



I know many are thinking that I am merajuk-ing which is why I am backing out, but I want you all to understand that I think I need to draw a line too.

Melayu Jati’s (Oh, MJ will do) message was not the first. I have received a few emails from people of various races (yes, “my” own people too) questioning my intentions, but from very wise advise from MarinaM, I ignored them.


MJ however, I believe, has gone a little too far. And I think there comes a time
when I need to put my foot down too.The power of suggestion is unfortunately, a very strong tool. If there are people going around saying things like what MJ has said, sooner or later, seeds of suspicion will begin to flourish.

And I refuse to let that happen. I refuse for something which is inherently, a selfless act of the community, to be turned into a lame excuse for a spit-fire. I refuse to let this campaign be tarnished by evil and snide comments.



I am not asking for people to worship the ground I walk on, but yes, I do
ask those with nothing constructive or helpful, to please shut up, lock the mouth, and throw away the key.


***


When we started, quite a few readers suggested we go to the press. The reason why I was adamant not to (and Kak Pi and MarinaM agree) was because I felt that:-


1) The family is not in need of money for something desperate like an impending do-or-die surgery for Aisya. We are merely helping them back on their feet, and in the course of it, let them know that we have not forgotten them.


2) Aisya is desperately terrified of strangers, and by highlighting her story in the press, we are opening doors for politicians/corporate organizations/members of the public to bunny-hop to her home, complete with curious by-standers and story-hungry press.


3) We should strive to protect the pride of the family, and of Aisya. Curiousity is something which rides the pinnacle in society today, and with Aisya’s very rare condition, people will be prone to go ogle her like some exhibition, and I was adamant about not opening doors for people to do so.


***


To be completely honest, I never, in my wildest dreams, expected that bloggers and their readers would be so receptive, and so generous, in so short a time. That I believe, is a landmark for all of us today, because it shows that while there are people like MJ, there are a lot of us who are not like that.


I think we have done a lot together, and this is one milestone (small, yes, but substantial) for our Golden Jubilee celebration. There are many Aisya’s in today’s society, and I am proud to know that we all stood up for one. After all, the best societies are the caring ones, no?


I’ll update all of you about Aisya in a year’s time, or if needed, in six months.


I want to take this opportunity to thank all the donors on behalf of Aisya’s family,
and to thank all the people who placed enough faith in me (MJ, stay in your tempurung!) to give with their hearts.


Also I think we all need to please thank all the bloggers who highlighted (directly and indirectly) Aisya’s plight:

MarinaM, Pi Bani, Jeff Ooi, Rocky, Nuraina Samad, Zorro, Susan Loone, June Tan, Azmi Ahmad, Ionbuck, Jenn (from USA) and Moola.



And to my friends who posted on their blogs: KitSze, SzeToo, Tiffany, KoK, Julian, WanAisyah, Innshan, thanks a lot too.




Let’s just all give ourselves a pat on the back ok =) and not get stressed up by people like MJ. Why raise the statistics of Malaysians with high blood pressure just because of some frogs?




Will keep in touch.



Cheers,
Daphne ‘In-need-of-rest’ Ling



Ps: Altogether now...*Ribbit*...= )



Friday, 13 April 2007

"Work is Worship, Service is Prayer"...


“Work is Worship, Service is Prayer”…

~Baha'i Writings~


Look at that smile: Me and Cerebral Palsy patient Sharvin Raj during play-therapy in the hospital...

After 8 months in the hospital, I was asked to sum my experience up in a few words to be shared with future volunteers...The experience was also supposed to be shared with doctors and nurses of the hospital to encourage them to support the voluntary service...

Here's what I wrote, in August last year:-

"Work is Worship, Service is Prayer": This pretty much sums up the reason why I volunteer. Voluntary work is a two-way process- besides the personal satisfaction, I have in fact learnt more in these 8 months than in my 13 years in school.

The doctors, nurses and attendants have been of great help and have provided much support and encouragement.

I will definitely carry and treasure this experience for the rest of my life, especially the friends that I have made and the people that I have met.

As for the time spent with the little sleeping angel who shared his life with me: Priceless…"

~Daphne Ling~


The little sleeping angel and me...

I was even more surprised (and touched!) when the sister of the ward I worked in reciprocrated the gesture. Here's what she wrote:-

I cannot forget the young volunteer who brought so much love and care for a child in our ward. She painstakingly took over the care of this child, with all the routine mundane chores that came with it.

Before long our little patient was blooming with all the attention and cuddles he was getting. It would be great if we could get more volunteers like her.

Volunteers can make a world of difference, and they do!

~Sister Kalwant Kaur~


At the Nurses' Station: Ooops...Caught sleeping on the job by one of the nurses:-


Falling asleep...


Asleep...

I mean, who would have thought a baby would have fitted so snugly into my arms? Who would have thought that me, the world's greatest clumsy-nincompoop, could actually carry babies for eight months, and not drop them once?


Hydrotherapy in the small pool in the hospital...


This picture is of an obviously apprehensive Jivan Akshay, who has Cerebral Palsy, having his first try in the water...

Hydrotherapy was something that I often looked forward to...It was used mainly for children who suffered from Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, and a whole host of other problems and disabilities...Hydrotherapy is used to help children with severe spasticity exercise their taut limbs (the water helps support their weight and makes it a little less painful)...Other times, it was just to add variety and fun for the children (and for me, I might add)...

Whatever it is, these children had to trust you before they would go into the water with you...

I had tons of fun too, making a fool of myself (what's new?) and playing with the water and equipment after the children had left...


My best friend, Tan Yean Mei and I, giving out the last bunch of balloons to the children in the ward...100 balloons, practically all blown by mouth, and distributed to three children's wards...*Phew*...

It really is the best kind of feeling to be able to just sit there and enjoy in the company of the people around you...It's a strong reminder that you don't have to have a Datuk or a Tan Sri or a Dr. in front of your name, because people couldn't care less about that...All they care about is whether or not you're sincere in what you do...

I've met many friends throughout my short stints here and there...But I definitely treasure all of them, even those from the furry variety... Below are a few of the more memorable ones...

Picture from The Star: Baby Amin and me in a village in Parit, Perak...

This is a picture of little baby Adam who was abandoned by his parents...I met Adam in a home in Kuala Kubu Bharu. Adam has got no right hand. His arm ends at the wrist...

This picture is of KT, the 3-year-old orang utan I had the opportunity of baby-sitting in Zoo Negara...

Voluntary Service at the Baha'i House of Worship in New Delhi, India where I served for 5 weeks. Picture is with some of my fellow volunteers. Altogether, I had the privilege of working with 39 other people from 16 different countries...

Kahlil Gibran once said:"You give but little when you give off your possessions. It is when you give off yourself that you truly give"...

How true, but some people just don't get it. And I pity them...

Monday, 9 April 2007

Aisya's List...



Photo by Zabidi Tusin (The Star)



Dear all,



Donations for Siti Aisya have reached slightly over RM 8100...The donations (some of which have been cashed, some still in cheque form, some in money order) came from as far as Sabah! The Shahidans are extremely grateful for everyone's generosity, and I would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone on their behalf...




Kak Pi too has just informed me that she has in hand another RM 500...

This just in: *A cheque of US$ 200 just arrived, all the way from the USA, for Aisya...*Sorry Sabah, kalah la in terms of distance!*...




The Shahidans received an anonymous donation of RM 2000 today (11/4), which means donations have now reached RM 11 400!*

I promised to provide a list of things that can be donated to Aisya, as some people find it erm, 'unsafe' to give money. Below are a list of things she needs, which we can help the family with:-



Diapers


Darling Aisya is only 8 kgs plus, so she generally wears a size M. She goes through about 7-8 pieces a day as the family now buys her the cheaper grade diapers, which are not very absorbent. This can go up to about 10 pieces a day. Anyway, we'll assume she uses about 8 pieces a day, which means she will need about 240 pieces of diapers in a month.

To sidetrack a bit: I suppose if she uses a better quality one, Aisya will not need as many, but it's just an opinion of mine...So maybe if someone wants to donate better quality diapers, she can make with 6 pieces a day?

I know for a fact that there are cheap brands from Tesco, Giant and this brand called Baby-Ku (A bag of about 80-slightly-more pieces are about RM 30-35). So Aisya will need about 3 bags a month...The more expensive will include Huggies, Mamy Poko (I think it is the most expensive on the market) etc...

Total, for a year:-

Approximately 36 bags (cheaper quality); 27 bags (More expensive quality)

Pledge(s) so far: 6 Bags (From Anonymous)...An RM 1500 pledge for diapers from Mr Andrew Chuah, which I believe is enough to cover one year's supply, as we already have 6 bags from Anonymous...




Food

Her daily porridge, fish, chicken, vegetables etc will be seen to by the family...

But if anyone can see to her milk, nestum and glucose, it will be most appreciated by the Shahidans.

At present, Aisya takes Anmum milk (3 years and above, any flavour). The pediatrician/dietitian have advised the parents to switch to PediaSure, but due to the steeper price, they have not done so. Aisya needs about 2 tins every month (1.8 kg per tin).

As for Nestum, she goes through about one tin on an average month (Price: About RM 9 per tin, unless you get it during promotions)...

Total, for a year:-

Milk: Approximately 48 (900 grams x 4) tins *Sponsored by Mr Ben Yeow*
Nestum: 12 tins (RM 108) *Sponsored by Mdm Sarojini*
Glucose/Polycose: 12-18 tins *Sponsored by Mr Santokh Singh*



Portable Suction Machine

The Shahidans are thinking of buying a portable, light-weight, battery-powered suction machine for Aisya. The present one which they are using is heavy and electrically-powered and was sponsored by Baitumal. The fact that it is electrically-powered means that they cannot carry it along with them when they take Aisya out, especially to HUKM for treatment.

As you all know, Aisya breathes through an opening in her trachea (in the neck). This opening has to be cleaned periodically to remove mucus, fluids, phlegm etc, thus the need for the machine.

The portable one is available from a supplier in Puchong (specifically, I don't know yet), and the cost is about RM 1600...


Pledge: 50% of cost of machine (From Anonymous), 50% of cost from Mr & Mrs Soon Poh Seng...

***



My hope is that we can all help to raise these products for Aisya for one year...This is to give the family time to try and stand on their own feet again, and I think one year is fair and sufficient...I don't want them to have to worry about Aisya's needs while they try and regain their foothold...When money is tight, you can cut back on clothes, vacations, phone bills, etc, but not Aisya's needs, right?



As usual, please feel free to contact me if you need to, either by email, phone or as a comment...


Please leave me a note if you wish to donate, so that I can update the list with what has a sponsor so we don't have repetitions...Doesn't have to be full year donation: You could just say: "I'll sponsor two months of *fill in the blanks*"...



Cheers people! Thanks for the generous spirit and support...




Wednesday, 4 April 2007

Am I Stupid?...


Sigh...

I witnessed a row today...Had just had lunch and finished class when it happened...

There I was happily chatting with a friend in one of the rooms when in walks this guy whom I shall refer to as A...I've seen A around quite a lot...Don't know him very well, but I always had been given this impression that A was a respectable man, who carried himself very well...

Anyway, A comes stomping in (literally). I looked up and was about to give him a smile when I realised he was in a towering temper. He looked past me and my friend, and pointed at my other friend who was sitting behind me, and said "You!"...

"This is my project. You f***ing b****, keep your nasty little paws off it"...He was fuming, and his tirade was clearly just beginning: "I call the shots, not you, so don't you dare approve the change of venue without consulting me!"...

I was shocked...The 'venue', by the way, refers to a change from the room on the left, to the one directly beside it, which is the one on the right...

I was shocked that any 'gentle'man could yell at a lady in public like that...And what was even more shocking was the fact that A runs some teambuilding company, or something to that effect...

Team-Building; Something which teaches people to believe that there is never an 'I' in anything, but that we always work as a 'we'...Something which preaches that there is strength in numbers, and that we must remember that no man is an island...

And we have A screaming that this is "my project...I call the shots..."

What happened to the 'we'? What happened to working as a team? What happened to strength in numbers? What happened to that nice smile and even sweeter voice? What happened to the 'let's build a better place...let's learn to work with one another; forget the differences, build on the strengths'?

What happened to all that crap? Because from where I am standing now, it sure sounds like crap...Complete and utter rubbish.

I used to believe that all these people should be looked up to...That we should learn from them as they have understood and seen things which we seem to have missed...

I have gone for quite a lot of these team-building, characted-building, schmel-schmelding (some willingly, some because I was led by the ear) and I used to think, that 'hey, I have lots to learn from these people'...But when I see them in their personal lives, I always end up thinking, 'I looked up to them'?

And you know what? I feel betrayed. I feel betrayed and hurt that I am such a believer in people...I feel betrayed that I am always looking at the goodness in people, at the traits that make people special...I feel betrayed that I have so much hope that people are kind...I feel betrayed that I am such a sucker that there is hope for the future, and that inherently, people will always let their human side win...I feel betrayed that I have so much faith...

Because it's beginning to look more and more like shit...

How can a 'team-builder' be so wonderfully 'team-building' and so full of concern during a camp, and turn into complete opposites after? We're talking about differences in one day...Today, nice; tomorrow, horrible...

And yet, I desparately try and believe that people seriously want to make this world a better place...I desparately try and believe that people do care and are concerned...

Sometimes, I do wonder...Why bother? Why bother at all? I'm just going to become disillusioned, and lose all hope...

I guess the adage: 'Those who teach, can't do' is true...It's very, very true...

Am I stupid in wanting to believe in the goodness of people? Am I stupid in wanting to believe that there is hope in humankind? Am I stupid in believing that those who come up with schmel-schmelding concepts want to make the world a better place, and not to satisfy their insatiable greed for money, power and a 'good face'?

I guess I am...